Orb Guest Photographs the Dark

We have a guest orb photographer for today’s post, Kathy Phelps, best known on WordPress for her blog, Nature Snippets: http://naturesnippets.com/

TreeOrbs

Kathy counted about 50 orbs around the huge elm tree by her barn. It’s a lovely tree and would make a good subject to come back to many times to check out the orbs who are at home within its branches.

Orbs in yard

I like the orbs on the upper left that seem to be coming in for a landing in front of Kathy’s house in Illinois.

Kathy continues to experiment with finding the best placement of camera to subject to bring out the orbs who soar through her property. She can feel them and is discovering their many colors as well. I look forward to her further adventures with orbs.

We have a special treat tomorrow, which Kathy will also enjoy. Klaus Heinemann, Ph.D., co-author of two books that are the classics on orbs: The Orb Project, and Orbs Their Mission and Messages of Hope, will be our guest bringing a new understanding of orbs. Tune in tomorrow evening for this rare presentation.

For those of you who are new to this blog, or would like to refresh your memory as to what orbs are, perhaps this will help: https://orbsdelight.wordpress.com/2012/11/17/photographing-orbs/

Elusive Orbs

This evening I stayed at home and simply went questing for orbs within my yard. I couldn’t see any on my view screen while I was photographing, so I was a little discouraged. It wasn’t until I loaded them onto the computer that I saw there was actually a cloud of them coming at me like a snow storm.

This is the very next picture, not quite a cloud anymore, but then there isn’t as much sky either.

You can see why I thought the orbs were eluding me, try to find this one. Hint: it’s a tear drop shape.

I could see that I probably had an orb in the trees on the middle right, but could not discern the ones in the sky at the time of the photo.

These I couldn’t see at all until I was at the computer.

I’m rather fond of the tear drop orbs.

This is not the moon beneath the leaves.

The bright center light is the moon, which is still less than a quarter full. So, this post is actually for those of you hunting orbs in the dark. Don’t be discouraged if you can’t perceive them immediately. They may not be revealed until you brighten the image and lessen the contrast, then the paler ones can be seen.

For those of you who are new to this blog, or would like to refresh your memories as to what orbs are, perhaps this will help: https://orbsdelight.wordpress.com/2012/11/17/photographing-orbs/